Does Experience Count?

Posted: March 2, 2016 in Uncategorized

If you were facing brain surgery – would you prefer a doctor that had done 25 of the operations you need or only one?

Most likely you’d want the surgeon with experience. Experience does count!

experience-McGuire-Air-Compressors

Same goes for lots of things, including the compressed air industry.
At McGuire Air Compressors, we are happy to say that we are celebrating 35 years of EXPERIENCE in 2016!

When your business counts on air – you can count on us

Since 1981, Tommy McGuire has owned and operated McGuire Air Compressors in Graham, NC.  He and his Certified Service Technicians have worked with compressors from ½ horsepower to over 700 hp.  McGuire Air Compressors, Inc. is located in a 10,000 square foot facility in the heart of Piedmont North Carolina.

McGuire Air Compressor services customers in central North Carolina and south central Virginia.

McGuire Air Compressors also sells nationally via their websites:
http://www.industrialaircompressors.biz/– Offering Champion Air Compressors
http://www.hosereels.biz/ – Offering Reelcraft Hose Reels for Industry
http://www.airdryers.biz/ – Offering Deltech Refrigerated Air Dryers

Experience counts.  Why not count on us for your next air compressor, oil & filters, replacement pumps and refrigerated air dryers.

McGuire-Air-35th-Year-2016-200wide

OSHA-Its-the-law osha_valve
The OSHA Safety Standard Regulation 29CFR CHXVII Paragraph 1926.302(b)(7) states:   All hoses exceeding 1/2-inch inside diameter shall have a safety device at the source of supply or branch line to reduce pressure in case of hose failure.

Prevent dangerous air hose whips and accidents.   Protect your most important assets: Your employees and their equipment.   OSHA COMPRESSED AIR SAFETY SHUT-OFF VALVES offers simple but efficient protection to pneumatic systems in the event of a broken compressed air hose or pipe.

Click here to view a PDF with the information you need to meet OSHA standards.

Call us to order the safety valve and reels you need-1-888-299-9999

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Another OSHA guideline publication states:  “Hoses, cables, and other equipment shall be kept clear of passageways, ladders and stairs.” 

OSHA says reduce your slips, trips and falls. Slips, trips and falls constitute the majority of general industry accidents, which cause 15% of all accidental deaths, and are second only to motor vehicles as a cause of fatalities. The OSHA standard for walking and working surfaces apply to all permanent places of employment, except where only domestic, mining, or agricultural work is performed.www.osha.gov

Consider adding reels to increase safety & efficiency with your electrical cords, welding cables, air hose, oil, grease, liquid/water or fuel hoses.  This could be one of your most effective equipment additions you’ll ever make…as well as one of the safest!

Here are 5 Reasons to use Hose Reels:

  1. Increase Efficiency Hose reels makes all your hose handling more efficient. An organized, clean workplace is proven to be more efficient.
  2. Provide a Safer Work Environment Hose reels decrease you chances of injuries from tripping hazards.  Reduce accidents and insurance expense:  Slips, trips and falls are the leading cause of work stoppage in industry. Reels can help you meet OSHA Safety Requirements.
  3. Protects Equipment Hoses (and cords) last five times longer when stored on a reel. This can save you from replacing hoses as often. Keep hose off the floor where it can be damaged by trucks, doors, and dropped tools.
  4. Stop Leakages Hoses on reels can reduce the threat of expensive leakages of air and any fluids carried through your hoses.
  5. Increase Productivity Locating your hoses quickly- when and where you need them- can increase productivity.  All these factors help improve your work environment, which saves you time, equipment and money. ____________________________________________________________

Reels are suitable for many applications – such as industrial, automotive, marine, chemical, welding, petroleum, food processing, aviation, and electrical.

Reels are used to transfer air, water, motor oil, transmission fluid, grease, gear oil, anti-freeze, diesel fuels, welding gases, fuel oil, liquid pesticides, fertilizers, detergents, hydraulic oils, cutting oils, printing inks, solvents, chemicals, and blacktop sealers.

Probably one of the largest uses of hose reels is for Compressed Air. Compressed air is clean, readily available, and simple to use. As a result, compressed air is often chosen for applications for which other energy sources are more economical.  Inappropriate uses of compressed air include any application that can be done more effectively or more efficiently by a method other than compressed air.

Don’t WASTE your Compressed Air. Check your facility for wasteful and perhaps even unsafe uses of compressed air. Bottom Line:   Invest in durable, quality reels that make hoses, cords and cables more productive, keep them easily accessible and make them last longer.

 

For more about Hose Reels visit www.hosereels.biz

Tommy McGuire
Owner of McGuire Air Compressors, Inc. “Real People with Real Air Compressor Experience” 1-888-229-9999 compressors@mcguire.biz

For Industrial Champion Air Compressors, Pumps, Manuals, Dryers  www.industrialaircompressors.biz
Reelcraft Hose Reels for air hose and other industrial applications      www.hosereels.biz
Deltech Refrigerated Air Dyers to reduce harmful moisture in your compressed air system  www.airdryers.biz.

Ask a Question:
What are some good trouble shooting tips to help me maintain my compressed air system?

Answer:
Here are some great Air Compressor Trouble Shooting Tips
to help you or anyone providing the regular maintenance for your compressed air system.

Below are listed several very common problems, their probable cause and some usual remedies for the trouble.

Of course, there can be multiple problems and unique circumstances to every compressor issue…but these tend to solve the most common situations.

PROBLEM:
Low pressure at point of use

Probable Cause: Remedial Action
Leaks in distribution piping: Check lines, connections and valves for leaks
Clogged filter elements: Clean or replace filter elements
Fouled dryer heat exchanger: Clean heat exchanger
Low pressure at compressor discharge: See below

PROBLEM:
Low pressure at compressor discharge

Probable Cause: Remedial Action
For systems with modulating load controls, improper adjustment of air capacity system:
Follow manufacturer’s recommendation for adjustment of air capacity system

Worn or broken valves Improper air pressure switch setting:  Check valves and repair or replace as required
Follow manufacturer’s recommendations for setting air pressure switch

Improper air pressure switch setting: Follow manufacturer’s recommendations for setting air pressure switch

PROBLEM:
Water in lines

Probable Cause: Remedial Action
Failed condensate traps: Clean, repair, or replace the trap
Failed or undersized compressed air dryer: Repair or replace dryer.  If you do not have an Compressed Air Dryer, consider adding this equipment.

PROBLEM:
Liquid oil in air lines

Probable Cause:  Remedial Action
Faulty air/oil separation: Check air/oil separation system; change separator element
Compressor oil level too high:  Follow manufacturer’s recommendation for proper oil level

PROBLEM:
Dirt, rust or scale in air lines

Probable Cause: Remedial Action
In the absence of liquid water, normal aging of the air lines: Install filters at point of use

PROBLEM:
Excessive service to load/hour ratio

Probable Cause: Remedial Action
System idling too much:
For multiple compressor system: consider sequencing controls to minimize compressor idle time
Adjust idle time according to manufacturer’s recommendations

Improper pressure switch setting: Readjust according to manufacturer’s recommendations

PROBLEM:
Elevated compressor temperature

Probable Cause: Remedial Action
Restricted air flow: Clean cooler exterior and check inlet filter mats

PROBLEM:
Restricted water flow

Remedial Action:
Check water flow, pressure, and quality; clean heat exchanger as needed

PROBLEM:
Low oil level

Remedial Action:
Check compressor oil level, add oil as required

PROBLEM:
Restricted oil flow

Remedial Action:
Remove restriction, replace parts as required

PROBLEM:
Excessive ambient temperature

Remedial Action:
Improper ventilation to compressor; check with manufacturer to determine maximum operating temperature.

Owned & Operated by
Tommy McGuire
McGuire Air Compressors, Inc.
“Real People with Real Air Compressor Experience”

For Champion Air Compressors…
http://www.industrialaircompressors.biz/

For Reelcraft Hose Reels for Air, Water, Oil & fluid
plus Electric Cord Reels & Welding Cable Reels…
http://www.hosereels.biz/

For Arrow Refrigerated Air Dryers
to remove moisture from your compressed air system…
http://www.airdryers.biz/

Email us:
compressors@mcguire.biz

Call us:
1-888-229-9999

Mailing address:
McGuire Air Compressors,Inc.
P.O. Box 1100
Graham NC  27253

 

Check out these great deals on used compressed air equipment:

http://www.industrialaircompressors.biz/used_equipment_in_nc

Tommy McGuire

McGuire Air Compressors, Inc. “Real People with Real Compressor Experience”

1-888-229-9999

www.industrialaircompressors.biz

www.hosereels.bizwww.airdryers.biz

 

Whether you are the business owner or the one who does equipment maintenance…you’ll save time and money by upgrading from mineral-based oils to quality Synthetic Air Compressor Lubricants.

If you are the business owner – you’ll love saving money because you upgraded to synthetic oil!

If you are the one who changes the oil – you’ll be glad to make a lot less oil changes!

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Eight proven benefits from upgrading to quality Synthetic Air Compressor Lubricants in Reciprocating Type Compressors:

1- Saves 7%-10% in Electrical Usage in Reciprocating Type Compressors

2- Creates Less Friction which Equals Less Wear

3- Oil Will Last up to 8 Times Longer than mineral based oils

4- No Carbon deposit build-up in Valves or Rings

5- Creates Thermal Stability & Solvency

6- No Seasonal Oil Change as with mineral oil

7- Less Impact on the Environment

8- Saves on Labor & Disposal Cost

 

Eight proven benefits from upgrading to quality Synthetic Air Compressor Lubricants in Rotary Vane Type Compressors:

1- Saves 8%-12% in Electrical Usage in Rotary Vane Type Compressors

2- Creates Less Friction which Equals Less Wear

3- Synthetic Oil Lasts up to 4 Times Longer than mineral based oils

4- No Carbon build-up in Vanes or Ports

5- Results in Thermal Stability & Solvency

6- No Seasonal Oil Change

7- Less Impact on the Environment

8- Save Money on Labor & Disposal Costs

 

Upgrading to a good quality Synthetic Compressor Oil gives you leading edge technology in lubricants:

– Profit from big savings overall, even though the initial cost a bit more

-Improve fire-resistance because of the properties of synthetic oils. Cleaner valves and less lubricant reduce the chance of fires and explosions in reciprocating air compressor systems

-Synthetic oils provide cleanliness in reciprocating air compressor crankcases that result in better heat transfer and prevention of moving parts sticking. The result can be less power usage.

 

There are lots of high-tech, scientific reports about synthetic lubricants you could read, but the bottom line is this: Upgrade to Synthetic Air Compressor Lubricants and save time and money!

Note: Not all synthetic compressor oils are the same. The quality and quantity of the base stocks and additives package are where the difference is. Remember the old saying – “You get what you pay for”? In this case – it’s really is true. Make sure when you upgrade from mineral oil to synthetic that you drain the mineral oil for a complete change. Don’t just “ADD” the synthetic oil to the old mineral oil.

 

Tommy McGuire
McGuire Air Compressors, Inc.
Email: compressors@mcguire.biz
www.IndustrialAirCompressors.biz
Located at 729 East Elm St, Graham NC 27253
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1100, Graham NC 27253
1-888-229-9999 or (336) 229-9999

Compressed Air Safety Tips

Compressed Air Safety Tips from http://www.hosereels.biz

  • ­­­Does your air pressure keep dropping while you are using your tools & equipment?
  • Have you added or are planning to add new equipment which uses air?
  • Are your air compressors working hard all the time- but you just aren’t sure how to figure how much more horsepower you need?

When your business counts on air – you need to know the valuable formulas and steps to help accurately determine how many CFM you use. You also need to know how to accurately figure how much additional CFM and horsepower you need when considering a new air compressor?

Here are some specific formulas that can help you determine how many CFM you presently use and how many more CFM you need to meet your desired PSIG. We will show you how to take this information and use it to determine how much air compressor horsepower you actually need.

Find out how many CFM your air compressor delivers

1. STOP the compressor unit

2. CLOSE the outlet valve on the tank/air receiver

3. DRAIN the condensate from air receiver until there is 0 PSIG –
then close the drain valve

4. NOTE THE TIME- in minutes & seconds (Best to write it down.) Then START THE UNIT.
When the compressor unit stops and unloads – then NOTE THE TIME again – in minutes & seconds. Convert the minutes into seconds and then total the number of seconds it takes between START and STOP/UNLOAD.

5. NOTE the GUAGE PSIG reading

6. NOTE the Air Receiver/Tank GALLON SIZE

7. USE THIS FORMULA:

TANK GALLONS x .538* x PSIG divided by SECONDS

EXAMPLE:

You have an 80 gallon tank, your total start to stop/unload time was
3 minutes and 30 seconds. Change the minutes to seconds timed
(60 x 3= 180 seconds plus 30 seconds which totals 210). You will use the total number of seconds (210) and the noted 175 PSIG within the formula as shown below:

80 multiplied by .536 = 42.88
42.88 multiplied by 175 (Example PSIG) = 7504.00
7504.00 divided by 210 (total seconds)= 35.74 CFM delivered

The example shows that the air compressor is delivering 35.74 cfm

Your Response to this evaluation should be to compare this number with what your air compressor manufacturer says your CFM should be and evaluate how efficiently your compressor is running.
If your air compressor is within 10% of manufacturer’s specifications, then the unit is OK, if not – repair unit and recalculate your needs.

Find out how many more CFM you need to
raise your PSIG

1 What is your desired pressure ______?
(Our Example125 psig)

2. What is your present operating pressure_______?
(Our Example 70 psig)

3. Divide desired pressure by present operating pressure
(125 psig divided by 70 psig = 1.79)

4. This gives us the X-factor needed for this formula (1.79 )

Multiply present air compressor cfm (35.74) by your X-factor (1.79)
(35.74 X 1.79= 63.98 This gives you the total cfm needed –
which is 63.98 for our example)

6. Deduct your present cfm from the needed cfm
(63.98 minus 35.74 present cfm = 28.24)

7. This gives you the additional cfm needed to raise your psig to the level you actually need. (which is 28.24 additional cfm for our example)

Translate your answers into how much horsepower
you actually need to operate

Divide your additional cfm needed by 3.5* (see the chart for your *actual compressor type & horsepower)
(28.24 ÷ 3.5 = 8.07 hp, which would be the additional horsepower needed for our example)

This will give you the additional horsepower you actually need.

(We will need to round up the 8.07 hp to 10 hp needed for our example. You will have to round up to the nearest standard
horsepower also.)

*CFM per compressor horsepower chart:

3.5.cfm per hp for small piston compressors ½-30 hp

4 cfm per hp for large piston 40 hp up & small screw compressors
2 hp-30 hp

4.5 cfm per hp for 40 hp-150 hp medium hp screws

5 cfm per hp for 200 hp-2000 hp large screw & centrifugal compressors
Note: Always buy CFM of delivered air at the PSIG you need…not horsepower.

Note: Always invest in at least 20% more CFM than your equipment needs. This will cover extra air usage for such things as air leaks and wear.

Follow these formulas and you can figure just how much more CFM and air compressor horsepower you really need to get the job done!

Compressor Terms you should know:

Cubic Feet Per Minute (cfm) – Volumetric air flow rate.

“psig” means pounds per square inch, GAGE pressure. Gage pressure is the absolute pressure of something, with the atmospheric pressure subtracted. In practice, when someone gives a pressure in just “psi” they probably mean gage pressure. If they mean absolute, they should be using “psia.”

Gauge Pressure – The pressure determined by most instruments and gauges, usually expressed in psig. Barometric pressure must be considered to obtain true or absolute pressure.

Load Time – Time period from when a compressor loads until it unloads.

Unload – (No load) Compressor operation in which no air is delivered due to the intake being closed or modified not to allow inlet air to be trapped.

Receiver – A vessel or tank used for storage of gas under pressure. In a large compressed air system there may be primary and secondary receivers.

Tommy McGuire

McGuire Air Compressors, Inc.
“Real People with Real Compressor Experience”

1-888-229-9999

www.industrialaircompressors.biz

www.hosereels.biz

www.airdryers.biz